Education Policy

Admissions Policy

As an independent graduate school known for our interdisciplinary nature, we accept graduates from all Keio faculties and departments, as well as graduates from universities nationwide. We place no restrictions based on the undergraduate major. We welcome all those who have problem-identification skills and sufficient fundamental academic ability to keep up with our classes. Additionally, we offer special support for international students and have a mentorship scheme which checks up on these students after entrance to the school. Furthermore, in the Education major, we have a special entrance exam for current working educators with the aim of supporting the recurrent education of professional educators. The criteria for the special entrance exam is different from that of the general entrance exam.

Curriculum Policy

Our curriculum and the skills which students will acquire are based on our diploma policy.

Sociology

In order to obtain a master's degree in the Sociology major, the following is required of students: (1) A high level of specialized knowledge, (2) high level investigative and analytical skills related to quantitative and qualitative sociological research, and (3) the ability to flexibly utilize a wide breadth of knowledge to interact with related fields of study. In the Ph.D. course, in addition to the three requirements above, students must also (4) acquire skills in setting problems and the planning and carrying out of research in order to conduct high-level academic research.

Curriculum Structure

The Sociology major is made up of four fields: sociology, cultural anthropology & folklore, communication & mass-communication research, and social psychology.

Classes on the history of sociology and sociological methodology form the foundation of the curriculum. Additionally, lectures and seminars are offered on more individualized and specialized topics such as theoretical sociology, family sociology, urban sociology, sociology of local communities, social stratification, international sociology, sociology of religion, medical sociology, and history of society.

In cultural anthropology & folklore, a wide range of lecture and seminar classes are offered which cover everything from the fundamentals to applied fields. Examples include history of various schools of thought, research methods, specific research topics, and regional studies. As cultural anthropology and folklore place importance on primary source materials obtained through qualitative studies, fieldwork is regarded as fundamental practice in the Ph.D. program. Students are expected to conduct research either within or outside Japan based on their own interests and to investigate the actual condition of culture and society, which is changing rapidly due to globalization.

In the field of communication & mass-communication research, we conduct research and education regarding various communication processes and phenomena including interpersonal and mass communication. More specifically, we offer lecture and seminar classes on media use, information behavior, mass communication theory, as well as news production processes and journalism, media policy and the media industry.

The social psychology field conducts research and education regarding the various areas of social psychology. More specifically, we offer lecture and seminar classes on various issues in social, industrial and organizational psychology, including interpersonal behavior (interpersonal communication, interpersonal influence such as requests and persuasion, social support, interpersonal attraction, interpersonal conflict, etc.), gaming, group psychology, career development, and investigative methodology.

In each field, lectures and seminars are mainly taught by faculty of the Graduate School of Human Relations. However, we aim to provide our students with an internationally high level of specialized knowledge by annually inviting eminent professors from both inside and outside Japan to lecture on recent topics and related fields.

Psychology

In order to obtain a master's degree in the Psychology major, the following is required of students: (1) A high level of specialized knowledge, (2) technical skills for performing experimental and applied research, (3) the ability to flexibly utilize a wide breadth of knowledge to interact with related fields of study, and (4) an attitude which will allow the student to continue contributing to society in the future. In the Ph.D. course, in addition to the four requirements above, students must also (5) acquire skills in problem-identification and the planning and carrying out of research in order to conduct high level academic research.

Curriculum Structure

As lecture classes, we offer Advanced (Special) Studies Experimental Psychology, Advanced (Special) Studies of Basic Psychology, Advanced (Special) Study of Behaviormetrics, Advanced (Special) Studies in Behavior, and Advanced (Special) Study of Neuroscience. Advanced classes are aimed at master's students while Special classes are aimed at students in the Ph.D. program and may be run in parallel if necessary. Lectures and seminars are mainly taught by faculty of the Graduate School of Human Relations. However, we aim to provide our students with an internationally high level of specialized knowledge by annually inviting eminent professors from both inside and outside Japan to lecture on recent topics and related fields.

Furthermore, we hold annual seminar and advanced seminar classes ("advanced seminars" are classes aimed at Ph.D. program students and may be run in parallel if necessary) in the core subjects of behavior analysis, perceptional psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, biopsychology, and cognitive neuroscience. Students in these classes will read related specialist papers as well as acquire experimental and applicative skills. Similarly, in the Experiment: Special Study of Psychology classes in the master's course, students assist professors in supervising the experiments of undergraduate students taking practical classes. This allows students the opportunity to review their own basic knowledge, as well as gain teaching experience.

Advanced (Special) Studies in Clinical Psychology, Human Engineering and Ergonomics, and Practice of Behavior Modification are all classes which aim to provide students with a wide range of knowledge which links with related fields, and to allow students to acquire a mindset of contributing to society. These classes also in part allow students to learn applicative techniques. Furthermore, due to the interdisciplinary nature of the school, students have the opportunity to take classes from other majors, which significantly contributes to their knowledge of related fields.

All Psychology major students, both in the master's and Ph.D. courses, are able to take classes from majors other than their own after consulting with their academic advisor. This gives students the opportunity to learn alongside and have discussions with students studying majors other than experimental psychology.

Education

In order to obtain a master's degree in the Education major, the following is required of students: (1) A high level of specialized knowledge, (2) technical skills for performing theoretical and empirical research, (3) the ability to flexibly utilize a wide breadth of knowledge to interact with related fields of study, and (4) an attitude which will allow the student to continue contributing to society in the future. In the Ph.D. course, in addition to the four requirements above, students must also (5) acquire skills in setting problems and the planning and carrying out of research in order to conduct high level academic research.

Curriculum Structure

The Education major is made up out of four fields: philosophy of education, history of education, educational psychology, and comparative education. As all four fields share the common thread of examining character formation from the viewpoint of education, master's course students from all fields are expected to take the Seminar: Education Studies class, while Ph.D. students take Seminar: Special Study of Pedagogy.

In the field of philosophy of education, we offer lectures and seminars on the philosophy of education and its history. Lecture classes are intended to give students a wide breadth of knowledge regarding the trends of the field, while seminars aim to promote the acquisition of specialized reading comprehension and technical skills, as well as skills in setting problems and the planning and carrying out of research in the context of philosophy of education or history of philosophy of education.

The field of history of education provides classes and lectures on the history of education in Japan. Classes cover not only empirical history but also the history of philosophy of education in Japan.

In the field of educational psychology, we offer practical classes in educational psychology in addition to lectures and seminars. Lecture classes are more common than in other fields and cover a wide range of material including the psychology of learning, behavioral genetics, and adolescent psychology.

The seminar classes are supervised by more than one full-time faculty member. Although these classes are a part of the field of educational psychology, in effect they are run as common courses.

The comparative education field provides lectures and seminars on a range of topics including comparative education methodology and comparative research regarding education reform. The major research themes of the field are higher learning and comparisons between Japan and the United States.

In each field lectures and seminars are mainly taught by faculty of the Graduate School of Human Relations. However, every year we also invite eminent professors from both inside and outside Japan to give classes.

Shared Curriculum Structure

The school prides itself on how the faculty members responsible for the curriculum of each major work together to create classes which span all three majors. Furthermore, another unique point of the school is our project classes which aim to promote joint research between multiple faculty members in one major, or between faculty members of different majors.

Diploma Policy

Standards for evaluating theses and dissertations
In advising and evaluating students' theses and dissertations, the following standards will be applied.

Master's thesis

  1. Clarity of issues identified
    How clearly does the student identify issues for research?
  2. Suitability of chosen research topic
    Is the student's research topic suitable considering the current state of the field?
  3. Literature review
    Does the student give a suitable review of previous research and show its relevance to their chosen topic?
  4. Validity of research methods
    Are the student's research methods valid for the chosen topic, and are analytical methods used appropriately?
  5. Logical cohesion of the thesis
    Is the thesis written in a manner which is logical and cohesive?
  6. Meaningfulness of research results
    Does the research give us new insights?
  7. Possibility to develop the research further
    Does the student demonstrate how the research can lead to further studies?
  8. Appropriateness of expression, notation, and format
    Are the student's expressions, quotations, references, etc. of a manner which is appropriate for an academic paper?

Doctoral Dissertation

  1. Clarity of issues identified
    How clearly does the student identify issues for research?
  2. Suitability of chosen research topic
    Is the student's research topic suitable considering the current state of the field?
  3. Literature review
    Does the student give a suitable review of previous research and show its relevance to their chosen topic?
  4. Validity of research methods
    Are the students research methods valid for the chosen topic, and are analytical methods used appropriately?
  5. Logical cohesion of the thesis
    Is the thesis structured systematically and written in a logical and cohesive manner?
  6. Meaningfulness of research results
    Does the research provide significant new insights which can advance the state of research in the field?
  7. Possibility to develop the research further
    Does the student demonstrate how the research can lead to further research?
  8. Appropriateness of expression, notation, and format
    Are the student's expressions, quotations, references, etc. of a manner which is appropriate to an academic paper?

Process For Earning Your Diploma